Thursday, April 13, 2017

M is for solving for m #AtoZchallenge

My guy has been teaching a course on weekends for a few years. I have listened in on a session here and there. Sometimes, the course is delivered online. Other times, it's in a classroom setting.

This semester, it's the latter. I once called the course Solving for m. My guy was discussing an equation and showing how to solve for m, the variable in question. Since then, we both call this course by this nickname.

On Saturday, my guy and I had this conversation.
"I wish that I could solve for m with you," he said, looking at me longingly.
"I know. You have to go to work soon," I noted.
"I want to solve for various slopes with you, in various positions," he said sheepishly.
"Ah, derivatives, I see," I remarked, with both of us laughing.
"Yes, I would be in a master bedroom with you for hours, solving for m."
We are a geeky couple. Math innuendos make us laugh.

He is sweet. He didn't want to leave that day. I didn't want him to leave, either.
"I would solve for m with you all day, if I could. I want to give you everything," he said lovingly.
"How about a million dollars?" I asked, jokingly.
"Um, no," he replied, smiling.
"Yes, that's not realistic. Both our incomes combined do not register on the million dollar scale. I'm good with having you," I remarked.
It's true. Money doesn't buy being with someone you love and vice-versa.

6 comments:

  1. Awww CB...what a awesome guy you have. Thanks for sharing this sweet story. :)

    Hugs and blessings...Cat

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    1. I concur, Cat. He is an awesome person. =)

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  2. We always solve for X. Never heard of working out M. Interesting. Happy Easter! M is for Marketing Methods as you Build a Better Blog. #AtoZchallenge.

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    1. It depends on the equation that you have to work with and the information you are given. If you have y = mx + b (standard linear equation), and you are given the values of (x,y) and b, you can clearly solve for m, which is your slope.

      Naturally, equations can be a lot more complex than this example, so you can potentially have plenty of variables that need solving.

      Thanks for dropping by! Hope you have a wonderful Easter, too. =)

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  3. This is just an adorable story. I love the dialogue.

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    1. Thanks for your kind words, Andy! I appreciate your stopping by.

      I am visiting your blog and am sorry about how rough things are. I went through a divorce, too. However, my situation did not involve children. Hang in there.

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